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Why Elearning Will Grow In Higher Ed In 2019

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Last year, eLearning Inside News predicted that eLearning would have a strong year.  In 2018, key drivers cited included growing student demand, changing faculty attitudes, and a surge in the global eLearning market. eLearning Inside is predicting that 2019 will be another strong year for eLearning in higher ed. While some of the factors driving the continued popularity of online learning at the postsecondary level remain constant, a few new factors appear likely to further drive eLearning in higher ed in 2019.

Five Drivers of eLearning in Higher Ed in 2019

Five Drivers of eLearning in Higher Ed in 2019

Non-Profit Universities Are Warming Up to For-Profit Partnerships

While resistance to for-profit education remains high among many faculty and administrators in the postsecondary sector, especially at public non-profit institutions, over the past year, a growing number of colleges and universities have teamed up with for-profit education companies. In the process, like it or not, the landscape of higher education is changing. Although some recent partnerships have proven highly fraught (e.g., the controversial launch of Purdue Global, which is Purdue University’s revamped version of the for-profit entity once known as Kaplan), other partnerships seem to be launching with little controversy at all (e.g., 2U’s recently announced partnership with Yale University).

Online Degrees Now Include More Ivy Options

From MIT to Harvard to the University of Pennsylvania, over the past year, more Ivy-league options have appeared in the online sector. For example, Harvard Extension School (HES) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) recently announced a collaboration that will offer learners a chance to pursue a Master of Liberal Arts (ALM) degree at HES after completing

MITx MicroMasters credential. The new program will focus on students currently pursuing MicroMasters credentials in management, sustainability, or development practice. Prior to the current collaboration with Harvard, however, students could already use their  MITx MicroMasters as a stepping stone to complete a graduate degree at MIT. In July 2018, the University of Pennsylvania announced plans to launch an online master’s degree in computer science in collaboration with Coursera.

The Global eLearning Market Continues to Expand

While the eLearning market in the United States certainly continues to do very well, the global market is also taking off. As recently reported on eLearning Inside, Cape Town, Nairobi, Kuala Lumpur, and Sao Paulo currently rank among the world’s top-20 tech hubs, but the Indian market is especially promising at this time. A recent study by Google and KPMG, for example, predicts that India’s online education market will grow to USD 1.96 billion and include around 9.6 million users by 2021. The study, “Online Education in India: 2021,” further predicts that while reskilling is currently the largest edtech market in India, by 2021, both the K-12 and test prep markets will dominate. Africa is another market where eLearning continues to take off, though, in some parts of Africa, Internet access remains an obstacle.

Students Are Demanding Cost-Effective Alternatives

A 2017 report by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve found that 53 percent of U.S. students who completed at least a bachelor’s degree acquired some debt in the process. In 2016-2017, the mean level of reported debt was $32,731, and as expected, those with graduate degrees were especially likely to report carrying debt. It is no surprise then that online degrees are increasingly being seen as an attractive alternative to full-time on-campus study. One notable program is the MITx MicroMasters. In this two-part program, students first complete a series of five to six courses for just over $10o0. By contrast, a full year in the same program on the MIT campus costs $74,000. Students who complete their coursework and pass the required exam or exams at the end of the MITx program have the option of completing their master’s on the MIT campus in just one semester–an option that dramatically reduces the cost of doing a graduate degree at MIT. But MIT is not alone in offering students affordable alternatives. Georgia Tech, the University of Pennsylvania, and a host of other universities are now rolling out high-quality online programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels that enable students to complete their educations for a fraction of the cost of studying on campus.

The 60-Year Curriculum Is Here to Stay

In today’s disrupted economy, life-long learning is no longer just for ambitious up killers. To survive in today’s economy, everyone will need to reskill on an ongoing basis. The idea of the “60-year curriculum” captures this shift. As Dean Hunt Lambert of the Harvard Extension School recently observed, moving forward, “You’re going to have to continue your education, not just skills development, but real knowledge learning over as long as sixty years.” The most viable way to do this, of course, is by shifting one’s learning from the traditional classroom to online programs. Indeed, Harvard University’s recent decision to partner with MITx reflects just such changing attitudes toward continuing education and online education.

 

posted Jan 8 in EdTech by Khemara

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+2 votes

Landing a lucrative role in any company is never a cakewalk. The professional world is constantly changing and the traditional education system has failed to equip us with the required skills to excel in today’s dynamic world of work.

The lifespan of skills acquired is getting shorter, and the demand for people with newer and advanced skills is increasing with each passing day. In such a scenario, up-skilling seems to be the only way forward.

There is a burgeoning need for newer skills and learning any of them could help one get that cherished promotion at work!

Why do we need up-skilling?

It won’t be an exaggeration to say that India has no dearth of talented people. However, talented people, with some right attitude and the passion to work hard can learn new skills that would help them rise up faster at their workplace.

In the year 2019, there would be 2.5 lakh IT jobs created for freshers in India. 

Jobs for Data Scientists, Machine Learning Professionals, Cyber Security, Augmented Reality would see an upsurge in demand, over and above the specialist jobs in Marketing, Growth Hacking and Mobile Application developers.

All these sectors are constantly evolving and up-skilling facilitates a cycle of high productivity, increased employment opportunities, income growth and development.

 

Upskill to future-proof your career

The right upgrading of skills goes a long way in improving one’s productivity and overall performance.

 

7 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT WHY UPSKILLING WILL BE SO IMPORTANT IN 2019:

1. Reportedly, 68% of employees prefer to learn at work and because up-skilling is a way to keep one abreast of industry trends and requirement. 

2. Executives prefer employees who avoid redundancy and promote opportunities to enable their employees to learn more.

3. The crème de la crème of all skill up courses in the year 2018 were Finance/Bitcoin/Blockchain, Writing, Digital Marketing, Project Management and Google Analytics. They are offered by e-learning websites like Coursera, Career Anna, Hubspot and Udemy. 

4. Online programmes on Marketing, Entrepreneurship and Public Speaking are always in vogue and the trend will continue in the year 2019.

5. Other courses to reign in the year 2019 would be based on hard skills which companies look for the most – SEO/SEM Marketing, Network and Information Security, Perl/Python/Ruby and Business Intelligence. 

6. According to a Forbes report, 58 million new jobs would be created in Artificial Intelligence by the year 2022. Thus, pursuing this stream would be a very good idea.

7. As per an India Today report, 50,000 jobs are lying vacant in the field of Data Science and Machine Learning with more and more companies trying to tap these new technologies. Professionals would benefit much from opting for a career in such an on-demand stream.

 

Not restricted to technical and functional training

Upskilling need not be strictly technical and functional. Familiarization with the new technological trends in the contemporary digital age helps in aiming for higher opportunities, but soft skills such as communication, leadership, collaboration, and time management are equally important.

As per a LinkedIn report, executives and people managers feel that leadership and communication are the two most important soft skills that employees need to acquire.

 

Online skill up courses can enhance the development of employees

Learning can be a tedious process is a continuous requirement. However, the problem of learning has been solved to a large extent with the proliferation of online tools, which are both convenient and flexible.

We, at Career Anna, want to create better professionals for the industries by bringing quality education beyond the classroom.

Our skill up courses have helped over 9,000 professionals across the country get placed in top companies like Cognizant, Accenture, Dell, Samsung, Infosys, Wipro, Tech Mahindra, TCS, and HCL across high growth technology roles, amongst many other Consulting and Product Companies.

Around 69% of the employees who took our skill up courses either got promoted at work or found better paying job opportunities.

Companies want people who can portray initiative, commitment, and the desire to move ahead. Taking up skill up courses to either enhance your skills or learn new ones will make managers and executives value you.

+1 vote

Staying on top of new developments in the eLearning and edtech fields can be a challenge. As new technologies create new opportunities, the field continues to evolve. But whatever your connection to the industry, it is important to be aware of best practices and new developments.  Twice a year, eLearning Inside recommends five upcoming conferences exploring best practices in the eLearning and edtech fields. While some of these upcoming events focus exclusively on training, others target educators working in the K-12 or higher education fields, and some target individuals working on both sides of the online learning spectrum.

Ed-tech

Five Upcoming eLearning Conferences

ATD TechKnowledge Conference, February 6-8, West Palm Beach

This year’s TechKnowledge Conference is scheduled to take place in sunny West Palm Beach in early February. This year’s conference will cover a wide range of cutting-edge topics, including augmented and virtual reality, artificial intelligence, microlearning, and adaptive learning. The ATD TechKnowledge Conference features tracks in eLearning, mobile learning, technology strategy, platforms, gaming, trending technologies, and virtual classrooms. This year’s keynotes include Segway inventor Dean Kamen, and Shaili Chopra, founder of SheThePeople TV, which is India’s largest platform dedicated to sharing stories about women. For more information, visit the ATD TechKnowledge Conference site.

Learning Solutions Conference and Expo, March 26-28, Orlando

Another annual favourite is Learning Solutions, which will take place from March 26-28 in Orlando.  Learning Solutions Conference & Expo is a forum for proven strategies, technologies, and practices that work in learning and development. As the organizers emphasize, “Whether you’re a one-person shop or part of a larger team, starting out or a seasoned expert, this year’s program offers learning experiences built just for you.” Find registration details here

ICELW, June 12-14, New York City

Every year the International Conference on eLearning in the Workplace (ICELW) takes place on the Columbia University campus in June. This year’s dates are June 12-14, and as in the past, conference organizer, Dr David Guralnick, has an exciting program planned. Keynotes will include Dr Meredith Broussard, Assistant Professor at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute of New York University. Broussard is the author of Artificial Unintelligence: How Computers Misunderstand the World. To discover more about ICELW, see eLearning Inside‘s 2018 coverage and explore ICELW’s online archive of proceedings from past events. To register for this year’s conference visit the ICELW website.

International Society for Technology in Education 2019, June 23-26, Philadelphia

Another upcoming eLearning conference is the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) conference in late June. ISTE is a nonprofit organization that works to accelerate the use of technology to solve educational problems and drive innovation. Global in focus, the ISTE has members from around the world, and every June, they meet to share best practices. This year’s ISTE Conference & Expo will take place in Philadelphia from June 23-26 and promises to be just as exciting as it has been in previous years. More details can be found on the ISTE Conference site.

Realities360 Conference & Expo, June 25-27, San Jose, CA

Now in its third year, Realities360 Conference & Expo explores immersive technologies to create new and exciting learning experiences. This year’s conference will focus exclusively on the strategies and opportunities of virtual and augmented reality with sessions, workshops, products, and services targeting the needs of the learning and development industry. The conference will be held June 25 – 27 in San Jose. For more information, visit the 2018 Realities360 website.

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+2 votes

According to a study by KPMG in India and Google in May 2017, Internet and smartphone penetration in India has been growing exponentially, with the number of internet and smartphone users expected to rise to 735 million and 470 million, respectively, by 2021.

The rapidly increasing access to technology has transformed the framework of education, especially in the last decade.

As such, technology is the biggest factor impacting Indian education now, with digital content and classrooms, online assessments and cloud-based platforms augmenting the academic and administrative processes of the K-12 sector.

The dynamic nature of technology development entails drastic changes in the modes of instruction, assessment systems, and even the physical makeup of the classrooms in short intervals of time.

Education becomes a more creative process with innovation in all these areas and evolves to cater to the changing requirements of future citizen and society.

The education landscape of India is changing year by year, but some of the current trends are speculated to continue their impact in the coming years owing to further developments in these fields.

According to Beas Dev Ralhan, CEO at Next Education, India's only end-to-end education solutions provider, integration of technology in education will continue at a fast pace throughout the country, promoted by the formulation of government policies such as the one against overweight school bags.

These moves have facilitated the popularity of new-age pedagogies, empowering students with self-learning abilities through e-learning tools, as well as the adoption of experiential learning solutions for a holistic learning experience.

Experiential learning techniques, the use of artificial intelligence in education, and personalised

learning techniques are some of the major edtech trends which will continue to revolutionise the Indian education system in 2019 as well.

 

Experiential learning techniques

Experiential learning is a method of learning by doing in which learners engage in direct experiences that connect with an area that they intend to develop.

Learners are actively involved in defining problems, asking questions, experimenting, analysing results and constructing meaning.

It blends conceptual learning, hands-on activities, strategic planning, collaborative efforts and self-evaluative measures to foster all-around competence.

Experiential learning is being implemented in India in the form of virtual labs, social media platforms, virtual and augmented reality tools, and gamification of learning.

Virtual and augmented reality helps in creating an immersive, real-life experience in classroom learning via graphical simulations.

Gamification of learning is an effective pedagogy which maximises student motivation and engagement by integrating game elements in learning environments.

Virtual labs are interactive environments for creating and conducting simulated experiments based on real-world phenomena so that students can interact with an experimental apparatus or other activity via a computer interface.

This eliminates the problem of accessibility as well as the lack of physical infrastructures for lab-based learning, especially in science subjects.

Social media can be used as a platform for developing 21st-century skills such as communication, collaboration, and creativity.

Artificial intelligence and personalised learning

Artificial intelligence is the ability of computers to mimic human cognitive functions such as learning and analysing.

AI has made considerable inroads in various fields of academia across the world, such as administration, learning, tutoring, grading, and assessments, and India, as one of the leading developing nations, is no exception.

By coupling it with data analytics, it has been possible to create adaptive learning technology, a tech-mediated way of providing every learner personalised courses based on their ability and performance.

While such technology does not aim to replace teachers, it facilitates students in managing their own learning.

One of the key challenges faced in the education sector in India is that the assessments are not streamlined across institutions. Leading experts often question whether we are truly measuring the relevant competencies of a student.

This is especially important for teachers, as they need to be aware of their students' academic interests and abilities. In order to meet this challenge, computerised adaptive tests are the best solution.

Another challenge is the 'one-size-fits-all' method of teaching because no two students learn the same way; their learning pace and style vary.

Personalised learning based on human resources is difficult to achieve in India with its high pupil-teacher ratio and lack of adequate financial resources. AI-based learning solutions can solve this problem and personalise education in India successfully.

How Next Education is helping usher in new Edtech trends

Next Education offers experiential learning with its NextLab solutions for English, Maths, Science and Robotics. It has also launched adaptive assessments for CBSE Maths and Science, and are working on similar assessments for other subjects and boards.

Apart from these, its award-winning in-house content, consisting of digital books and HD animated videos available on LearnNext and TeachNext@Home solutions, allows students to independently bridge the gaps in their learning.

In addition, the online Q&A forum for doubt clarification, practice papers and solved NCERT papers for more practice, IIT foundation courses for future attempts in medical or engineering exams and Science resource kits help provide an all-around learning opportunity to learners.

+1 vote

According to a Northeastern University/Gallup poll, most Americans are optimistic about artificial intelligence’s (AI) impact on their futures while, at the same time, expecting the net effect of AI to be an overall reduction in jobs. If we manage AI effectively, I believe it can be a net benefit to both society and the economy.

Is AI (Artificial Intelligence) a game-changer for higher Education?

The question is: How will higher education manage AI?

Unfortunately, higher education does not have a reputation for managing change effectively. Our experience is much more one of coming late to the party—and not of our own accord. We cannot and should not do this with AI.

First, much of the expertise to develop AI is coming from university laboratories, with AI hot spots in university centres such as Boston, San Francisco, Chicago, and the Research Triangle of North Carolina. If we can develop AI for businesses at home and abroad, why can’t we do the same for ourselves?

Second, many creative applications of AI have already been developed to solve problems within the university. Certainly, enrollment-management processes, as well as today’s learning management systems, look nothing like those of 20 years ago. These changes are clear applications of AI. At the end of the day, however, the application of AI within the university is quite limited.

Where are the higher-ed AI opportunities?

To find opportunities for AI growth within the university, we need to distinguish between activities that are uniquely human as opposed to those that can be computerized. Individuals excel at defining problems, distinguishing between “good” and “bad,” at idiosyncratic tasks such as detecting false positives, and in developing novel combinations not anticipated by previous experience. Computers excel at tasks that involve well-understood rules and procedures.

Furthermore, human decision making is enhanced when it occurs in groups. Social facilitation, cooperation, division of labour and the collecting of different perspectives, knowledge, and experience all combine to enhance decision making by groups.

Of course, neither individuals nor groups are without their problems. Individuals can be slow and inefficient in their decision making, to say nothing of the limits a single individual’s knowledge and experience. Likewise, groups can be guilty of premature closure, becoming too risky or too conservative because of preconceived expectations and groupthink. Much of the work of organizational psychology has focused on how to manage individual and group decision making so as to keep the good and minimize the bad.

Thus, if AI is seen not as a way to replace the individual but as a way to make individuals and groups more effective, both the impact of AI and its acceptance will be greatly improved. Today, augmented reality has greater potential for changing how we do things in higher education. Interesting examples of this concept can be found in the business world, where AI is used to facilitate human fraud detectors for banks and human translators and editors in publishing.

How can this distinction yield applications within higher education?

While MOOCs have not yielded the disruptions that many expected, they have had a significant impact on the way we deliver course materials. Lectures on most introductory topics are readily available on the web and the push for flipped classrooms is ubiquitous. These applications facilitate what individual instructors do.

Where AI can make its mark

The real impact on learning can come through learning management systems (LMSs). We have known for quite a while that we can use technology to manage classroom participation. There is much research, including my own, that shows that anonymous input systems, when added to regular or online classrooms, increase the participation of individuals who would normally shy away from raising their hands or volunteering comments.

Applications are being developed to use AI to track student questions asked in a class and direct them to answers and to other students with the same questions. The Minerva Project is so convinced of the power of such technology that class discussions occur only online—despite students living together in the same building.

Furthermore, the massive amount of data generated by LMSs has the potential to increase the effectiveness of learning. Researchers at a school where I previously worked used data on students’ online participation to identify within the first two weeks of a class which students were likely to perform poorly. They were then able to change these students’ participation patterns and thus their outcomes.

Getting faculty buy-in
The question, however, is whether such applications will be embraced by the faculty members who fear that change will result in their demise. And at their core, many faculty members believe that learning is a uniquely individual process. Until professors see AI as a means of enhancing their effectiveness, resistance will continue.

Disruptors are on the horizon. The entrance of Arizona State and Purdue into the online marketplace is significant. MBA programs are ripe for disruption; most business school deans expect the part-time MBA market to shift to online delivery in the next five years. These online platforms will accelerate the shift to AI-managed learning.

The future for AI within the university is bright. Applications will proliferate and finally disrupt the teaching paradigm. The danger is for institutions that come late to the party and not of their own accord.

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