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How Can a Teacher Help in Student Career Guidance?

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If asked to take a walk down the memory lane into your childhood, what are the first few things you’d remember?

Your memories with family, friends, your school and… TEACHERS!

Teachers play a crucial role in every student’s life. They are every student’s first guide to academics & career. As a Teacher, one not only is responsible to deliver subject knowledge but also impart moral values for life. A teacher’s role doesn’t end here, their responsibilities vary from student to student based on the relationship they build with them.

Why does a Teacher play a vital role in Student Career Guidance?

Recall your classroom and remember what you initially wanted to become. When a Teacher, Principal or Parent asks ‘What do you want to become in life?’ most of us have our answers ready like Astronaut, Pilot, Doctor, Journalist, Teacher, Actor, and so on. Well, the truth is that not all of us end up doing what our first career choices are. Why not? Because of the lack of information and career guidance.

As a Teacher, you already are a career guide to your students. They not only look up to you for the area of the subject you teach but also for their further interests, information around it and scope of it for their future. A student learns words like profession, career, college and success in school, and look up to their teachers for guidance. Since students spend most of their time at school, only a Teacher can know their aspirations better.

How can a Teacher help in Student Career Guidance?

Being a Teacher, you already have gone through a student’s milestone years. School, Entrances, College, University and finally landed a Career of your choice. This itself gives you an opportunity to remember your journey and guide the students better.

Having a career conversation during class helps in sharing knowledge, as well as build curiosity among students. This helps them understand their interests and importance of education and learning from a very young age. They say ‘it is the destiny of few to mentor greatness’, and as a Teacher, it is the biggest privilege to guide students towards a brighter future.

Ask yourself if you have the passion towards Teaching as a profession and want to guide your students if the answer is yes, there’s nothing that can stop you. Consider yourself as one of those Super Teachers who goes the extra mile for their student’s success.

As a Teacher you can follow these activities to guide your students better:

  • Conduct a class survey on careers and take up topics on various professions twice a week
  • While teaching a particular subject, make sure you give some career examples
  • Make sure you are interacting with your students and show that you are equally interested in their career choices
  • Talk to their parents about their wards career thoughts during PTMs
  • Encourage students to research and polish their skill set

Well, the list can go on, but as a professional one must also take up a course that will help in identifying, understanding and analyzing a student’s interests, strength, desire and behaviour.

You must be thinking that you’re a Teacher and not a Career Counselor, but why not a Career Counselor? As a Teacher you already are playing the role of a Career Guide, a smarter thing to do would be a professional certification that will enhance your knowledge and skill set to help guide your students better, in return adding immense value to your own professional graph.

Your intention to guide students is 100% sincere, but is it possible to guide an entire class? Or the whole batch for the matter? Here’s where a renowned certification will not only provide the above benefits but also give you a 360 degrees exposure to the education industry along with its changing needs.

Ever since the Central Board for Secondary Education has made it mandatory for schools to have counsellors, progressive schools in India have been eagerly looking for professional & certified career counsellors.

posted Jan 11 in General by Darareaksmey

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The name psychologist may flash many images from the pop culture. The characters from epic movies such as One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Good Will Hunting, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, The Sixth Sense, Split, and many more, may also rekindle your dormant memories. You might have also searched on the web to know how to become a psychologist. That being said, Psychologists are adept at studying the human psyche. With ample psychology courses in their kitty and loads of practical experience, they help individuals solve their problems related to thoughts and emotions

 

Psychology course

A person’s behavior is a result of a mental map drawn by the five senses. As psychologists study the impact of mind on the body, they come up with valuable suggestions to their clients to improve their life with a refined set of behavioral traits. The key lies in proper advice and right guidance to fine tune their thought process and hone the mental faculties. If you draw a parallel to the modus operandi of a psychologist to a career counsellor, they are quite similar. That’s a surprising factor.

Read more: Be a Career Counsellor!

 

Let’s run down the activities of a psychologist and relate them to that of a career counsellor

Assessment

Psychologists assess the root cause of all the problems and suggest correctional therapies. They have put the subjects to certain tests to deep dive into their problems. Career counsellors use psychometric assessments to know students’ personality type and offer career-related suggestions accordingly, With the knowledge of educational psychology, Psychologists can draw the personality traits from the reports in a better way. And this aspect makes them good career counsellors. Now, that fuels the process to assess the career guidance courses and zero in on the best one.

Psychology courses in india

 

Goal Setting

On the lines of a psychologist setting goals for treatment, a career counsellor sets career goals for students and creates a roadmap for success. A career counselling course helps the counsellor to identify the key attributes in a student profile and map them to their dream university requirement. The course also helps counsellors to chalk out SMART goals for the students.

students goals

 

Help & Hand-holding

Psychologists help people to overcome their challenges and traumatic experiences. Likewise, career counsellors help students overcome the hindrances in career path and handhold them to make informed decisions, A psychologist can be a great career counsellor as the ability to emote and empathize with the subjects is a common trait in both the professions, All they need to do is put their hands on psychology counselling courses.

Yes, a psychologist can become a career counsellor, but the former should gain insights into various courses. That makes a career counselling course imperative and it checks all the boxes of requisite skills to take up the profession. Career counselling in India is a growing field and psychologists can up their ante by doubling up as career counsellors.

in General
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If your students knew how much more money they could earn if they studied hard, went on to further education and got good grades, do you think it would make a difference to them? 

That was part of a question posed in a new paper published in the Journal of Development Economics and featured in the January edition of the Centre for Education Economics’ (CfEE) Monthly Research Digest

Ciro Avitabile and Rafael De Hoyos ran a randomised controlled trial in Mexico designed to address whether or not providing students with better information about the earning returns of education – and the options available to them – led to greater effort and learning. 

The experiment involved about 4,000 Mexican Year 10 students, across 111 classrooms in 54 schools. They first asked students how much they thought they could earn if they progressed to different stages of education. 

Both boys and girls underestimated the average earnings of adults with a high-school degree and overestimated the earnings of adults with a university degree. 

Want to motivate students? Tell them learning boosts earning power

Setting the exercise

They then started the trial: 26 schools were randomly allocated to receive the intervention and 28 schools were randomly allocated to the control group.

The intervention consisted of an exercise that provided the following information through specially designed interactive computer software: 

1. The benefits: average wages of workers with different levels of schooling.

2. The costs: details of a government scholarship for higher education.

3. How long the benefits might last: average life expectancy.

The educational outcomes analysed were obtained largely from the results of the Enlace examination, which students sit at the end of Year 12. This is a low-stakes test with no bearing on graduation, university admissions or school funding, but is highly predictive of future academic and labour-market outcomes.

For various reasons, examination data was available for only 61 per cent of the students in the trial.

A second set of outcome measures were derived from a university placement exam used by a subset of universities.

Mixed picture

So what were the results? 

First, the intervention increased students’ expectations of how their future earnings might increase if they committed to education, with associated positive effects on the level of effort they reported putting into it. 

However, the information provided had no effect on the probability of students taking the Enlace low-stakes test. 

For those that did take the test, there was a large, positive effect on maths scores, but only a statistically insignificant positive effect on Spanish scores. 

The impact size in maths was almost large enough to close the gender gap between boys and girls – and larger than the effect of coming from a high-income family. 

Difference in outcomes

Unfortunately this did not follow through to any statistically significant effect on the probability of sitting the university placement exam, nor on scores in that examination.

Effects on the low-stakes test were slightly larger for girls than boys, which appears to be due to the fact that the information intervention improved the aspirations of girls in particular. 

Consistent with this explanation, the information intervention increased the likelihood that girls (but not boys) chose to study economics in high school, and made them less likely to have married at ages 18-20 – an indication of their desire to go to university. 

Equity issues

Effects were also larger, however, for children from wealthier households – suggesting the intervention had equity implications that must be considered.

From a policy perspective, the fact that the intervention costs next to nothing and is inherently scalable makes it attractive. 

Of course, it doesn’t solve the core challenge of improving the quality of teaching in low-to-middle-income countries, and it’s important to take equity implications seriously. 

But free interventions that raise pupil achievement are rare and this one certainly warrants further exploration in other settings.

Lee Crawfurd is a fellow of the CfEE and deputy editor of its Monthly Research Digest. This blog is based on his selection for the January issue of the digest. You can view a flipbook version, download a pdf copy and subscribe to receive copies of the digest free of charge here

The CfEE is an independent thinktank working to improve policy and practice in education through impartial economic research

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In November 2018, Michael R. Bloomberg announced a donation of $1.8 billion to Johns Hopkins University to create a fund that would help low and moderate-income group students complete their college degrees. Without a doubt, this is an incredibly meaningful initiative. However, it led me to start wondering if monetary support alone is enough for students with special accessibility needs or students who come from a variety of marginalized backgrounds.

When we think of college, the first question that often comes to mind is affordability. But affordability is not the only factor. Most educational institutions provide financial support to a few selected students in the form of scholarships and loans. However, students require much more than just financial support to survive four years of college and develop the skills and confidence they need to begin successful careers.

How Edtech Entrepreneurs Can Make College More Accessible To All Students

Most colleges fall short here. There are far more inequalities and biases embedded in the fibers of our society than what financial aid for tuition can bridge. I believe that real college access should open doors for students irrespective of race, gender, immigrant status, family income or physical mobility. A recent study revealed that at some of the best colleges across the United States, more students were from the top 1% than from the bottom 60% of income groups. 

Entrepreneurs building companies of the future should be concerned. The workforce, comprising of millennials driven by intellectual curiosity, moral obligation and exposure to humanitarian causes, is inquisitive about freedom, equality and inclusivity. An employer is judged by its commitment to society and causes. Especially in tech startups, graduating students have begun to consider the brand image of a future employer before saying yes to an offer. Therefore, it will be increasingly beneficial for entrepreneurs if they build brands that nurture an ecosystem where students are provided opportunities based on their merit and not simply their elite pedigree.

As part of their measures to diversify their student bodies, colleges often claim to support students by providing them with tuition fee waivers. But free tuition is helpful only when one is able to get an offer of admission. Moreover, there are indirect costs beyond tuition fee that financial aid doesn’t cover, such as food, housing, and supplementary course material. This forces many students to earn money during the time that they should be studying. Some incur large personal debt, others skip classes to work odd jobs, while a few succumb to financial stress and drop out.

The problem becomes even more complex when dealing with learners from diverse backgrounds who have special needs such as students who require accessibility considerations and students with learning disabilities.

 

Having worked closely with various state public schools with students from mid- to low-income families as well as accessibility services at various colleges, I’ve observed that students require a lot of support beyond classroom lectures. Unlike students from affluent families who get mentoring and support right from the start, less privileged students struggle to balance classes with part-time jobs. That’s where edtech entrepreneurs such as myself come in, by building systems that enable students to have access to higher education and study materials. Here’s how we can provide support beyond financial aid.

1. Increased Accessibility To Higher Education Even Before College

Tech entrepreneurs are in a position to influence change at the grassroots level. The pyramid leading to success in college is built on the cornerstone of early education in high school. Edtech entrepreneurs can help in two ways:

• Provide technology training for teachers in low-income neighborhoods. According to the Education Week Research Center, teachers in under-funded schools are less likely to receive technological training for teaching when compared to their counterparts in wealthier schools. Edtech companies can provide skills training for teachers on their platforms.

• Provide high school students with summer jobs/internships that give them access to an environment with technology and give them an opportunity to work in the tech-startup landscape once they graduate.

2. Corporate Network Support Circles

College is where the blueprint of the business world is laid down, and it’s important to inculcate diversity at this grassroots level. Change doesn’t start from top-down leadership; it happens from the bottom up. Currently, about 72% of CEO’s in top Fortune 500 companies are white males, and less than 1% are African-American females.

One of the key hindrances in diversity at the top level is that people tend to hire or favor candidates similar to themselves -- usually from the same schools. Students with special learning needs bear the brunt of this even more. Even if they manage to steer through their financial constraints, it is incredibly difficult to break through the glass ceiling without a supporting network.

Colleges should aid in creating corporate networks where diverse groups of students can get the right introductions. Tech entrepreneurs can help further by promoting diversity initiatives in their organizations that call for meritorious students from lower socioeconomic standing. Such initiatives should begin at the high-school level. Entrepreneurs can also support non-Ivey, state schools and community colleges that hold job fairs and employment drives.

3. Subsidized, Affordable Textbooks And Study Materials

The rising costs of textbooks add a significant burden on students who struggle to make ends meet on their limited financial aid. Even though there are a lot of services that provide secondhand books or online books, a college student still ends up spending over $1,200 on average, according to the College Board. Edtech entrepreneurs and colleges should join forces to provide subsidized books and online notes for a nominal fee. 

It’s easy to get access to reading lists of various subjects and provide materials to students accordingly in the form of study guides, notes, homework help, etc. In fact, many startups, including my own, are already doing that.

Edtech companies currently exist in their bubbles -- creating products that are redefining education. However, it is becoming increasingly important that policymakers and entrepreneurs work together to steer the discourse of higher education. It surely will be a long journey to effect change, but it will be worth starting today. 

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