top button

The Power Of Edtech In Developing Countries

+1 vote
55 views

Edtech is really taking off in developing countries. Its growth has been stimulated by a mix of grassroots initiatives from local entrepreneurs in developing countries and aid from international organizations (such as the UNICEF Development Fund which has pledged $9 million to edtech initiatives). Here, we explore the ways in which edtech has the power to revolutionize education in developing nations and to vastly increase enrolment in education at primary, secondary and tertiary levels.

The Power Of Edtech In Developing Countries

Developing countries are often characterised by a lack of high-quality infrastructure. Poor quality roads and a dearth of reliable transport links can have a substantial negative impact on school attendance – and this includes both the attendance of pupils and of

Edtech surmounts these challenges by enabling learners to access online courses remotely. Poor transport infrastructure is thus no longer a barrier to learning. Moreover, the provision of free online courses along the MOOC model means that a lack of financial resources does not present a barrier to learning either. Theoretically at least, a student in a remote part of Sub-Saharan Africa could enrol for free in an online off-campus course at Harvard if they so desired.

The future is bright for edtech in developing countries as it provides a very real solution to the financial and infrastructure-related difficulties that learners in these countries often experience in their attempts to access education. Nevertheless, there are still several challenges to be met in order for edtech to achieve its maximum potential in the developing world.

One of the key challenges to m-learning and elearning is the lack of mobile phone and internet coverage. Though rates of mobile phone ownership in most developing countries are pretty high, access to online learning is often hampered by patchy broadband availability. In Sub-Saharan Africa, for example, full 3G and 4G coverage are not estimated to be available until after 2020. This threatens to exacerbate the gap in educational levels between developing and developed nations.

Overall, though, it is clear that edtech is a hugely beneficial resource for developing countries as it can provide high-quality distance learning to students in remote areas who previously had little or no access to education. Are you an educator or entrepreneur? Maybe it’s time to turn your attention to edtech in developing countries.

posted Jan 24 in EdTech by Polen

  Promote This Article
Facebook Share Button Twitter Share Button Google+ Share Button LinkedIn Share Button Multiple Social Share Button

Related Articles
+2 votes

The EdTech marketplace is undoubtedly reshaping school systems. Nowadays, students can easily access knowledge online, tutoring sessions with the click of a button and interact with content in newfound ways. The ubiquitous nature of apps and online forums has made it so that students cane more comfortable using media than the traditional learning tools. This blog stands to explore these questions.

How Big Is The Edtech Marketplace?

Apps and online tutoring sessions seem even more accessible than person-to-person engagement. While students would need to schedule time with a tutor or with their teacher outside of class time, it is far easier to go onto YouTube or search your question online. The ETIN (Education Technology Industry Network of SIIA) represents and supports developers of educational software applications, digital content, online learning services and related technologies across the K-20 sector. More and more money is being pumped into an industry that wants to answer to the nature of technology in the household.

Now nearly every young student has access to a computer or smartphone in some capacity. According to an article by Education World, the U.S. EdTech was an estimated $8.38 Billion in 2014, with no end in slowing down in sight. This is an industry that is growing at an accelerated rate to parallel the rate at which technology is now advancing.

With the rate at which the tech market is growing, educators have to ask whether or not these ESo instead of the EdTech Marketplace providing students with useful tools for students, it can turn into a futile attempt for technology to help students engage with content in a meaningful and productive way. In effect, the EdTech Marketplace stands to lose by not giving their audience the tools they need.

For instance, students that watch Khan Academy’s YouTube videos to learn a topic may be too distracted to focus on the video. Without a teacher present, a student is much more likely to get distracted, play on their phone and miss the entire premise of the video. Hffect of EdTech tools precisely, but the American school system is still many rankings behind what is expected. The U.S. was ranked 25th in the world in science and math education in 2015. Singapore and Hong Kong came first and second respectively. According to TechinAsia, Asia is seen as the next frontier in EdTech. The industry is projected to grow by 8 percent to the US $252 billion by 2020 in the global market.

However, this may not be due to the use of Edtech. Instead, culturally, the commitment to education is strong in those regions and has been for many years. Accordance of education in these households, they are willing to adapt to different learning climates. Thereby, using EdTech to shift the learning process. While the US is cation and to create an expectation that education comes first.

Since it appears the EdTech Marketplace stands to alter the face of education for many years to come, it is important to ask other questions related to the effect it will as well. How does the EdTech world affect the person-to-person engagement of learning? What does it do to students if they are not able to use the content to learn in person, instead relying on online tools to help them through the problem set?

Generation Z students who have grown up with laptops, iPads, and smartphones. So their brains have evolved in such a way that allows them to process more information at faster speeds than previous generations of to the social aspect of learning. Otherwise, it will merely be a tool in which students engage with a robot. The best way to counter this is by giving a student an authentic audience.

While some critics criticize the Khan Academy approach, it is helpful that on the other side of the screen is a real person. Learning then becomes a social act rather than a process of computing.

As technological tools advance and the EdTech Marketplace continues to fund learning in this way, then the marketplace must be ready to give students an interactive experience that can allow for better learning and retention of knowledge, while also improving the education system that has been seemingly failing students for decades. Perhaps the EdTech Marketplace needs to grow in order to figure out the best ways to adapt to the learning experience. The growing interest in EdTech shows that there is an interest in reshaping the education system to be a better tool than ever before and making learning only a click away.

in EdTech
+2 votes

According to a study by KPMG in India and Google in May 2017, Internet and smartphone penetration in India has been growing exponentially, with the number of internet and smartphone users expected to rise to 735 million and 470 million, respectively, by 2021.

The rapidly increasing access to technology has transformed the framework of education, especially in the last decade.

As such, technology is the biggest factor impacting Indian education now, with digital content and classrooms, online assessments and cloud-based platforms augmenting the academic and administrative processes of the K-12 sector.

The dynamic nature of technology development entails drastic changes in the modes of instruction, assessment systems, and even the physical makeup of the classrooms in short intervals of time.

Education becomes a more creative process with innovation in all these areas and evolves to cater to the changing requirements of future citizen and society.

The education landscape of India is changing year by year, but some of the current trends are speculated to continue their impact in the coming years owing to further developments in these fields.

According to Beas Dev Ralhan, CEO at Next Education, India's only end-to-end education solutions provider, integration of technology in education will continue at a fast pace throughout the country, promoted by the formulation of government policies such as the one against overweight school bags.

These moves have facilitated the popularity of new-age pedagogies, empowering students with self-learning abilities through e-learning tools, as well as the adoption of experiential learning solutions for a holistic learning experience.

Experiential learning techniques, the use of artificial intelligence in education, and personalised

learning techniques are some of the major edtech trends which will continue to revolutionise the Indian education system in 2019 as well.

 

Experiential learning techniques

Experiential learning is a method of learning by doing in which learners engage in direct experiences that connect with an area that they intend to develop.

Learners are actively involved in defining problems, asking questions, experimenting, analysing results and constructing meaning.

It blends conceptual learning, hands-on activities, strategic planning, collaborative efforts and self-evaluative measures to foster all-around competence.

Experiential learning is being implemented in India in the form of virtual labs, social media platforms, virtual and augmented reality tools, and gamification of learning.

Virtual and augmented reality helps in creating an immersive, real-life experience in classroom learning via graphical simulations.

Gamification of learning is an effective pedagogy which maximises student motivation and engagement by integrating game elements in learning environments.

Virtual labs are interactive environments for creating and conducting simulated experiments based on real-world phenomena so that students can interact with an experimental apparatus or other activity via a computer interface.

This eliminates the problem of accessibility as well as the lack of physical infrastructures for lab-based learning, especially in science subjects.

Social media can be used as a platform for developing 21st-century skills such as communication, collaboration, and creativity.

Artificial intelligence and personalised learning

Artificial intelligence is the ability of computers to mimic human cognitive functions such as learning and analysing.

AI has made considerable inroads in various fields of academia across the world, such as administration, learning, tutoring, grading, and assessments, and India, as one of the leading developing nations, is no exception.

By coupling it with data analytics, it has been possible to create adaptive learning technology, a tech-mediated way of providing every learner personalised courses based on their ability and performance.

While such technology does not aim to replace teachers, it facilitates students in managing their own learning.

One of the key challenges faced in the education sector in India is that the assessments are not streamlined across institutions. Leading experts often question whether we are truly measuring the relevant competencies of a student.

This is especially important for teachers, as they need to be aware of their students' academic interests and abilities. In order to meet this challenge, computerised adaptive tests are the best solution.

Another challenge is the 'one-size-fits-all' method of teaching because no two students learn the same way; their learning pace and style vary.

Personalised learning based on human resources is difficult to achieve in India with its high pupil-teacher ratio and lack of adequate financial resources. AI-based learning solutions can solve this problem and personalise education in India successfully.

How Next Education is helping usher in new Edtech trends

Next Education offers experiential learning with its NextLab solutions for English, Maths, Science and Robotics. It has also launched adaptive assessments for CBSE Maths and Science, and are working on similar assessments for other subjects and boards.

Apart from these, its award-winning in-house content, consisting of digital books and HD animated videos available on LearnNext and TeachNext@Home solutions, allows students to independently bridge the gaps in their learning.

In addition, the online Q&A forum for doubt clarification, practice papers and solved NCERT papers for more practice, IIT foundation courses for future attempts in medical or engineering exams and Science resource kits help provide an all-around learning opportunity to learners.

0 votes

Every time is the best time to pick up a good read and indulge in it.

 

But, if you are an edtech enthusiast, this probably be the best time to stock up your shelves with amazing books and work up on your perspective and knowledge.

Considering the pace at which edtech is being embraced, it is essential for stakeholders to be aware and have sound knowledge of the complete revolution. The past, Present and what all the future awaits.

The list of books below will help edtech enthusiasts like you with all of this.

1. Digital Literacies: Concepts, Policies and Practices by Colin Lankshear (Editor)

This book brings together a group of internationally-reputed authors in the field of digital literacy. Their essays explore a diverse range of the concepts, policies and practices of digital literacy, and discuss how digital literacy is related to similar ideas: information literacy, computer literacy, media literacy, functional literacy and digital competence. It is argued that in light of this diversity and complexity, it is useful to think of digital literacies - the plural as well the singular. The first part of the book presents a rich mix of conceptual and policy perspectives; in the second part contributors explore social practices of digital remixing, blogging, online trading and social networking, and consider some legal issues associated with digital media.

2. 21st Century Skills: Rethinking How Students Learn (Leading Edge) 1st Edition by James Bellanca (Author), Ron Brandt (Author)

This anthology introduces the Framework for the 21st Century Learning from the Partnership for 21st Century Skills as a way to re-envision learning and prepare students for a rapidly evolving global and technological world. Highly respected education leaders and innovators focus on why these skills are necessary, which are most important, and how to best help schools include them in curriculum and instruction. 

3. A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination of a World of Constant Change, Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown

This one looks at how constant change helps to keep students inspired in the potential of the future. The authors look at how the culture associated with technology has become fluid and adaptable. It is also an incredible challenge for educators. It contains numerous stories and interesting tales about those challenges and how technology even provides many of the answers to the problems it creates.

4. One World Schoolhouse: Education Reimagined by Salman Khan

Educator and entrepreneur Salman Khan (founder of Khan Academy) saw how education failed his relative with no apparent reason. The young girl mentioned at the start of the book is described as “logical, creative, and tenacious” and yet still faced with a slippery dilemma- a dilemma thrust upon her by orthodox, cookie-cutter educational mandates created over 200 years ago. Without the same restrictions, Khan helped that young woman find academic success. You may ask, success at what academic? What is an academic success? Is it just learning to continuously pursue passions and turn those passions into practical impacting meaning? Well, it looks different for everyone, and that is absolutely the point of Khan’s vision. Finding success does and will continue to diversify as does the world. Part of finding that success means access: is the material readily available, is it affordable, is it manageable, is it going to motivate the individual to learn more?

One World Schoolhouse is not the “self-driving car” of the humanities. This model is all about human interaction and the intersection with technology, and how educators become part of this revolution.

5. Grown Up Digital: How the Net Generation is Changing Your World by Don Tapscott

Grown Up Digital reveals:

- How the brain of the Net Generation processes information

- Seven ways to attract and engage young talent in the workforce

- Seven guidelines for educators to tap the Net Gen potential

- Parenting 2.0: There's no place like the new home

- Citizen Net: How young people and the Internet are transforming democracy

Today's young people are using technology in ways you could never imagine. Instead of passively watching television, the “Net Geners” are actively participating in the distribution of entertainment and information. The book is a must read to understand the way we can protect ourselves and our students in the digital world.

6. Social Media Wellness: Helping Tweens and Teens Thrive in an Unbalanced Digital World by Ana Homayoun

In this book expect to learn about how social media affects education, a trajectory of social media’s impact throughout its brief — yet potent — history, social media’s cognitive effect on tweens, and much, much more. Homayou even addresses self-care by discussing sleep, stress management, exercise, and safety. Administrators, educators, and parents rejoice: the flagship book on social media wellness has finally arrived!

7. Out of Our Minds: Learning To Be Creative by Sir Ken Robinson

Ken Robinson argues that organizations everywhere are trying to fix a problem that originates in schools and universities: "It is often said that education and training are the keys to the future. They are, but a key can be turned in two directions. Turn it one way and you lock resources away, even from those they belong to. Turn it the other way and you release resources and give people back to themselves. To realize our true creative potential-in our organizations, in our schools and in our communities we need to think differently about ourselves and to act differently towards each other. We must learn to be creative." Ken Robinson The updated 3rd edition features a new introduction, modernized case studies, updated demographics and revised sections around technological developments and recent changes to the education system.

...