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How Can We Create an Entrepreneurial High School Experience?

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With a new generation dominating the society today, one can no longer assume that educated young people will enter a workforce where their skills are wanted. Having said so, schools no longer must worry to prepare students for jobs that do not yet exists. Rather their focus should be to prepare them to be agile and adaptable in the face of profound skills.

How Can We Create an Entrepreneurial High School Experience?

The students can go into a constantly changing world that will require flexibility, creativity, collaboration and the nimbleness to adapt to rapid change. And increasingly, the students will need to think like entrepreneurs. In fact, entrepreneurship has almost become the buzz word of the decade. Realizing the importance of such skills in the rapidly changing economy, many schools have therefore taken the leap to implement entrepreneurship as an important subject in the curriculum.

But there are also schools that are unable to do it well and considering it, here are certain ways following which other schools too can join the league of visionary schools and start creating an entrepreneurial high school experience in schools.

1. Promote Key Entrepreneur Traits

Entrepreneurs are individuals who exercise initiatives and are synonymous with start-ups. With such in mind, schools need to foster key traits such as high level of self-reliance and optimism as well as the motivation to strive for excellence in students. Once such traits are nurtured rightfully, students automatically realise that they indeed are entrepreneurs in something.

2. Making the Learning Experience Practical & Real World like

Merely including entrepreneurship in the curriculum isn’t enough. The bottom line in teaching entrepreneurship in the classroom and make such experience as practical and real world as possible. A good way to start is to think of learning entrepreneurship as you would any other apprenticeship. The student should take on project-based work and be given opportunities to be resourceful and creative.

Organizations such as Wildfire Education assists schools in creating learning experiences which help students master skills and gain confidence by solving real-world problems on teams. Similarly, hack in a box is a school program that evokes students to solve real-world challenges.

3. Highlight Soft Skills and High-Level Thinking

 

Teamwork and collaboration is mandatory and needs to be incorporated into task completion. Students need to be taught to think critically and analytically. Such implies that the focus on concepts, principles and values need to take priority over knowledge of the curriculum. Entrepreneurs not only need to be intelligent but flexible as well to adapt to changes that occur in their field. The other essential skill that is regarded as extremely essential in the technology-dominated world is communication skills because entrepreneurs must know how to communicate their vision clearly.

4. Encourage Students to Study the Success and Failure Stories

An important section that schools need to include in entrepreneurship is research on current businesses in a specific field. Students should know the art of analyzing the companies as well as learn the philosophies of all-time greats.

Alongside reading the success stories of companies, students need to also read the failures or why companies turn up unsuccessful and analyse the reasons. Such practice gives an excellent opportunity to the students to learn from other companies’ mistakes and also know on the trade secrets among successful entrepreneurs.

5. Developing the Ability to Influence

Perhaps one of the most important attributes that every entrepreneur needs to have a strong grip over is to develop the ability to influence. In the practical world, entrepreneurs need the ability to sell their ideas or perhaps even their company. This is why, while teaching entrepreneurship in schools, particular attention needs to be given on including the important skills to articulate thoughts clearly and effectively. Stakeholders buy-in aspect is the most important part of running and leading an organization. Entrepreneurs need to be influencers and they must know the art to lead and have a plan to back up their vision.

Thus, schools looking up to create an entrepreneurial high school experience for students can succeed in their mission only if they start helping students develop entrepreneurial mindsets.

Do you think likewise? What are your views? Write to us and express your opinion on it to take the discussion forward.

 

posted Feb 4 by Sokna

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Degree Level: Not Specified Country: Korea, North Deadline: 31 Mar 2019

Summer Korea Experience Program 2019 for High School Student

ELIGIBILITY

The participants of the Korea Experience Program should meet the criteria as follow: 
- High School Students (14 – 18 years old) 
- Commit to join full program 
- Able to adapt new environment easily 
- Able to pay the program fee and transportation to and from Korea 
- Health physically and mentally

BENEFIT

Live for 5 days in Seoul, Korea 
Learn and understand Korean culture directly 
Heritage walking tour around Seoul 
Experience to be like local people by experiencing the local traditions 
Experimental learning 
Certificate of participation from AYFN

DESCRIPTION

Experience Korea with the AYFN’s Korea Experience Program. This program is open to high school students and learners desiring a short-term immersion program in Korean language and Korean culture. 

With the goal of increasing foreign students’ understanding of The Republic of South Korea, The AYFN Exchange Academy and Seongbuk Global Cultural Village are offering an invaluable Korean learning cultural immersion program. The program combines Korean language training with daily activities and cultural excursions to enhance the Korean experience. It’s open to High School students. 

This entails a program which is specifically designed to offer Korean classes for students/youth from ages 14-18, as well as a chance for these students to gain a cultural understanding of Korea. This will be done through both visiting famous Seoul attractions and partaking in typical cultural activities such as experiencing Korean tradition (wear handbook), making your own Korean dumplings or learning about traditional Korean Calligraphy. 

Our aim is to inspire the students to open their minds to other cultures and recognize the importance of language learning at the same time. We want the students to end their trip by leaving with a better knowledge of Korea and a firm basis of the Korea language. 
During the program, students will take public transport (Bus, Metro, subway train) to deepen understand about Korean way of life and be like a local.

HOW TO APPLY

Please send these documents into korea.ayfn@gmail.com and cc into ayfn.hq@gmail.com 
:: Mandatory documents::
1. Scanned passport 
2. Scanned student card 
3. Short essay: “Why would you like to join our program and your expectation” (A4, 1 page only, Time new roman 12) 
4.Curriculum vitae or resume

in Training
+1 vote

Higher education institutions are moving away from traditional, lecture-style pedagogy toward an active-learning model, which emphasizes collaboration, flexible spaces and the use of technology to engage and interact. 

As educators evaluate their own campus needs for active-learning solutions, the following best practices can guide them toward the most effective implementations. 

Create a Space That Encourages Flexibility

Early versions of active-learning classrooms encouraged students to collaborate by seating them at round tables. But these lacked the flexibility that is a hallmark of contemporary learning spaces, whose designs allow students and faculty to adapt the space to their needs. 

“Fixing [circular] tables to the floor is repeating the same thing you did in the old-style, theater lecture halls,” says Malcolm Brown, the director of learning initiatives for EDUCAUSE. “[Universities] adopt themselves to a certain learning style, but they can’t be universal if things are bolted down.”

Flexibility can come in the form of movable desks and chairs, but it also means giving students tools, such as interactive whiteboards, that they can use as they move around the room and interact

“It is important to have marker board space that is dedicated to each respective table so that students feel empowered to get up to do diagrams, to engage with one another, to map out what it is they are talking about, or sometimes there are just activities that require you to make lists,” says Christopher Brooks, research director for EDUCAUSE. 

Robust Internet Is Essential for Active Learning

Although active-learning environments do not require advanced classroom technologies, reliable networking on campus is essential to ensure students can fully participate in active-learning activities. 

“Active learning has to extend outside of the classroom,” says Top Hat CEO Mike Silagadze. “It’s not about just what happens during the lecture. It’s also about what happens before class and then after class.”

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You may have missed it during the summer heatwave, but a very English education technology revolution was announced in the Daily TelegraphIt was the conclusion of intense months of work. There had been a fair amount of Post-it notes, flip charts and workshops involving educators, stakeholders, policymakers and businesses. There was positive support from a small team of Department for Education civil servants, all with a keen interest in education technology. 

Education secretary Damian Hinds demonstrated that he had “got” education technology by recognising that: “There is clear, untapped potential for schools, colleges and universities to benefit even further from the power of technology to support students to learn, reduce teachers’ workload and save money.”

'Are we finally seeing an Edtech revolution?'

Why did that take so long?

In 2010, the incoming the coalition government got started on major education reform with a “bonfire of the quangos”. In some ways good, it also led to the demise of Becta (originally the British Educational Communications and Technology Agency), the organisation tasked with supporting schools to use education technology, and meant we lost an important national conversation about education technology.

Despite the computing curriculum and a big dose of “robot fever”, there had been no real long-standing leadership for education technology in the DfE for years. Various task forces had seemed to suggest a start, stop mentality from government. In that time, England has fallen behind Wales and Scotland, which have, for example, created and developed national platforms – Hwb and GLOW respectively – to share and explore the impact of edtech on teaching and learning.

Systemic change is hard and it’s not that these nations have all the answers, but in England we desperately need to restart the discussion at a national level to find out properly how education technology can make a meaningful contribution. What’s also striking is that since 2010 there has been growing recognition, from other parts of Whitehall, that edtech is also important for the UK’s economy, for jobs and exports. Most recently, in 2017 the Digital Strategy, honed by Matt Hancock, MP, stated: “Education technology is one of the fastest growing sectors in the UK, accounting for 4 per cent of digital companies, and UK businesses have become world leaders in developing innovative new technologies for schools.”

A national strategy for edtech

This is welcome but it urgently needs to become part of a wider strategy for edtech so that there is a coherent approach across government. It is energetic minister Sam Gyimah who is charged with taking this forward.

Despite the wilderness years, progress has been made in the use of edtech by schools. It should no longer surprise that there are real areas of promise across maths with Sumdog, Hegarty Maths, Times Tables Rockstars and Doodle Maths. In reading, the support from ReadingWise and Pobble is impressive and the creative inspiration offered by Night Zookeeper or the immersive Now>Press>Play delights learners.

Scotland’s SpyQuest and Brighton’s Curiscope use the latest augmented and virtual reality for good. Esri UK leads the way in free geography mapping for schools and Crick Software pioneers inclusive edtech. UK organisations FutureLearn, Micro:bit and Raspberry Pi open up learning in new ways to millions of people across the globe.

There are also networks to support the adoption and understanding of edtech by schools and colleges. In further education, the Blended Learning Consortium is a positive example and came out of the good work by FELTAG (the Further Education Learning Technology Action Group).  And market-leading Apple, Google and Microsoft products invest in growing networks of trained, certified, educator ambassadors. But surely these corporate networks can work more effectively together to support adoption and understanding of edtech across schools, colleges and universities? Can we, for instance, create meaningful regional hubs of expertise across the country?

It is against this backdrop, that Edtech50 Schools, supported by Intel, is launching its hunt to find schools that demonstrate excellent digital leadership and practice. It’s needed because the education minister’s summer announcement is a start rather than an endpoint.

Our vision for Edtech 50 schools is that it will help to create a national, school-led network, and one that has the expertise to be heeded by the DfE. It needs to embrace a broad vision and be alive to the possibilities that technology can bring to every aspect of school life – for too long we have ignored the fact that educational technology can rationalise the back office as much as enliven and focus learning and properly support the teacher.

The positive work of groups of committed individuals, the Independent Schools Council Digital Strategy Group, the London Grid for Learning, schools and some multi-academy trusts suggest real opportunity and potential in strengthening the grassroots but with a national focus. Investing in innovation and educators to guide their peers reaps dividends.

Let’s hope this is more than just a short-lived, summer holiday edtech romance.

As we continue with another round of positive consultations on this education technology revolution; it’s good to know it’s already started around the country and beyond.

Now it needs focus, investment and leadership. And ambition.

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