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Edtech trends of 2018 that will continue to impact education in 2019

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According to a study by KPMG in India and Google in May 2017, Internet and smartphone penetration in India has been growing exponentially, with the number of internet and smartphone users expected to rise to 735 million and 470 million, respectively, by 2021.

The rapidly increasing access to technology has transformed the framework of education, especially in the last decade.

As such, technology is the biggest factor impacting Indian education now, with digital content and classrooms, online assessments and cloud-based platforms augmenting the academic and administrative processes of the K-12 sector.

The dynamic nature of technology development entails drastic changes in the modes of instruction, assessment systems, and even the physical makeup of the classrooms in short intervals of time.

Education becomes a more creative process with innovation in all these areas and evolves to cater to the changing requirements of future citizen and society.

The education landscape of India is changing year by year, but some of the current trends are speculated to continue their impact in the coming years owing to further developments in these fields.

According to Beas Dev Ralhan, CEO at Next Education, India's only end-to-end education solutions provider, integration of technology in education will continue at a fast pace throughout the country, promoted by the formulation of government policies such as the one against overweight school bags.

These moves have facilitated the popularity of new-age pedagogies, empowering students with self-learning abilities through e-learning tools, as well as the adoption of experiential learning solutions for a holistic learning experience.

Experiential learning techniques, the use of artificial intelligence in education, and personalised

learning techniques are some of the major edtech trends which will continue to revolutionise the Indian education system in 2019 as well.

 

Experiential learning techniques

Experiential learning is a method of learning by doing in which learners engage in direct experiences that connect with an area that they intend to develop.

Learners are actively involved in defining problems, asking questions, experimenting, analysing results and constructing meaning.

It blends conceptual learning, hands-on activities, strategic planning, collaborative efforts and self-evaluative measures to foster all-around competence.

Experiential learning is being implemented in India in the form of virtual labs, social media platforms, virtual and augmented reality tools, and gamification of learning.

Virtual and augmented reality helps in creating an immersive, real-life experience in classroom learning via graphical simulations.

Gamification of learning is an effective pedagogy which maximises student motivation and engagement by integrating game elements in learning environments.

Virtual labs are interactive environments for creating and conducting simulated experiments based on real-world phenomena so that students can interact with an experimental apparatus or other activity via a computer interface.

This eliminates the problem of accessibility as well as the lack of physical infrastructures for lab-based learning, especially in science subjects.

Social media can be used as a platform for developing 21st-century skills such as communication, collaboration, and creativity.

Artificial intelligence and personalised learning

Artificial intelligence is the ability of computers to mimic human cognitive functions such as learning and analysing.

AI has made considerable inroads in various fields of academia across the world, such as administration, learning, tutoring, grading, and assessments, and India, as one of the leading developing nations, is no exception.

By coupling it with data analytics, it has been possible to create adaptive learning technology, a tech-mediated way of providing every learner personalised courses based on their ability and performance.

While such technology does not aim to replace teachers, it facilitates students in managing their own learning.

One of the key challenges faced in the education sector in India is that the assessments are not streamlined across institutions. Leading experts often question whether we are truly measuring the relevant competencies of a student.

This is especially important for teachers, as they need to be aware of their students' academic interests and abilities. In order to meet this challenge, computerised adaptive tests are the best solution.

Another challenge is the 'one-size-fits-all' method of teaching because no two students learn the same way; their learning pace and style vary.

Personalised learning based on human resources is difficult to achieve in India with its high pupil-teacher ratio and lack of adequate financial resources. AI-based learning solutions can solve this problem and personalise education in India successfully.

How Next Education is helping usher in new Edtech trends

Next Education offers experiential learning with its NextLab solutions for English, Maths, Science and Robotics. It has also launched adaptive assessments for CBSE Maths and Science, and are working on similar assessments for other subjects and boards.

Apart from these, its award-winning in-house content, consisting of digital books and HD animated videos available on LearnNext and TeachNext@Home solutions, allows students to independently bridge the gaps in their learning.

In addition, the online Q&A forum for doubt clarification, practice papers and solved NCERT papers for more practice, IIT foundation courses for future attempts in medical or engineering exams and Science resource kits help provide an all-around learning opportunity to learners.

posted Feb 11 by Jorani

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For years, YouTube has been a major platform for educational experiences around the world. Many teachers and professors upload their lectures to the platform. Edtech companies use it to show off their latest products. And more importantly, people with unique knowledge routinely use it to educate learners on specific subjects. It’s no surprise, therefore, that many are using it to learn about learning. There are numerous edtech- and eLearning-focused YouTube channels. The following mark a few of our favourites. 

14 Edtech Youtube Channels To Watch In 2019

Edtech YouTube Channels

ISTE

When it comes to edtech-focused YouTube channels, the International Society for Technology in Education is a good place to start. ISTE functions as a premier membership organization produces the most widely recognized document for standards of technological education, and hosts one of the most popular edtech annual conferences. 

They’ve been YouTubing since 2010, and their videos run the edtech gamut. Their library includes many short videos made by edtech experts on some of the most cogent edtech topics of the day, like OER, mobile devices in the classroom, AI, and personalized learning. They also upload keynote speeches from their annual event, videos supporting their standards, and much more. 

The Edtech Podcast

After launching in February of 2016, The Edtech Podcast is currently on episode #133 and counting. If podcasts are not part of your daily routine, their YouTube channel uploads every episode in video form and also includes footage of the various live shows they record. 

Created and hosted by the U.K.-based Sophie Bailey, the podcast frequently features discussions of emerging edtech and classroom implementation with guests ranging from CEOs to experienced teachers. Before launching the podcast, Bailey worked as head of content at Bett, the annual U.K. trade show and conference.

Ed on Edtech

For most people, education is a specifically local affair. While we have access to educators and learners from around the world, we still go online from the same computer in the same environment with the same technology and data infrastructure day in and day out. 

Dr Edward Tse, therefore, decided that he would go and check out how edtech is deployed in classrooms and other environments around the world. 

Mr Tompkins Ed Tech

The creator knew simply as ‘Mr. Tompkins’ has worked in the past as a math and computer science teacher in the U.K. He knows focuses his energy on ICT Strategic Development at the university level. A tech agnostic, he is both a Microsoft Certified Educator, a Microsoft Innovative Educator Expert, and an Apple Teacher. 

Mr Tompkins’ videos are primarily math-related how-tos incorporating the various tools his various tech company certifiers have developed.

E-Learning Uncovered

The product of Artisan E-Learning, this channel is intended primarily for eLearning developers and edtech instructional designers. That said, you don’t need to be writing software from scratch to benefit from these videos. Many, such as ‘Tips for creating Great Sounding Audio in Audacity,’ or ‘Photoshop for Learning: Taking the First Steps,’ target a more general audience and everyday teachers who might be looking to add some flare or polish to their lessons. 

GeoGebra

One of the most powerful and popular math tools on the planet, GeoGebra’s YouTube channel is dedicated almost exclusively to videos explaining the various uses of their software and apps. If you haven’t heard of GeoGebra before, be sure to check out their new AR math simulator along with the 3 part interview we conducted with COO and CFO Stephen Jull earlier this year. 

eLearning Brothers

eLearning Brothers is a company based out of Utah that creates custom eLearning modules, templates, and conducts training as well. Their YouTube channel is fairly wide-ranging and includes short videos by eLearning experts on specific topics, webinars, how-tos, and more. Occasionally they also run a series of instructional videos on their own products as well and often feature work created using their own library of templates.

Texas Instruments Education

When most people hear eLearning or edtech, they don’t immediately think about calculators. Texas Instruments’ YouTube channel, however, has a huge library detailing the advanced math that is possible on their machines. The channel also contains several other videos, such as AP and SAT math test prep, videos from their annual conference, broad discussions of STEM education, webinars, and even a how-to on grant writing. While some might consider calculators a hold over from the 20th century, T.I.’s YouTube channel is decidedly current.

AdobeELearning

Any creative person using digital technology has likely used or considered using some of the software created by Adobe. Many schools provide access to their Creative Suite. This YouTube channel, however, provides a home for educators and instructional designers using their Captivate software and eLearning Suite. These products allow users to author their own eLearning modules and lessons without the hard coding. 

Their videos are almost entirely focused on these Adobe products, but they’re also highly engaging and occasionally hilarious. 

TED-Ed

While TED talks, and especially their franchised TEDx analogues, have devolved in the past several years from amazing perspectives from niche experts around the world to frequent instances of humble bragging, oversimplification, and advertorial-style self-promotion, the TED-Ed YouTube channel is relatively free of these negative qualities. 

These well-produced animated videos can both teach learners about tech or also act as course supplements and good introductory material. Some, like ‘What’s a smartphone made of?’ or ‘How exactly does binary code work?’ could fall into both categories. No videos contain any instances of Bono (literally) pretending to be Jesus

Edtech Conferences

In addition to the channels listed above, many annual edtech, eLearning, and education-focused conferences also regularly update their own channels, often uploading videos of full keynote speeches, workshops, and more. We’ve listed a few of our favourites below. 

SXSW EDU

Possibly the premiere North American tech conference, SXSW EDU throws up most of their typically hour-long talks. While the conference goes far beyond education technology, there’s a good amount of tech in the mix as well. 

ASU + GSV

Arizona State University and the self-described ‘modern merchant bank’ that is Global Silicon Valley might sound like strange bedfellows. Their annual conference goes even further beyond edtech than SXSW EDU, but they also bring together some of the most interesting and innovative education-focused technologists and venture capitalists in the world. 

NY EDTECH WEEK

While the 2018 NY Edtech Week got bumped to June of 2019, the conference notably uploads the pitches startups make to investors, which make for interesting watches/listens. They also upload most talks delivered over the course of the event. 

EdTech Israel

Now in its fourth year, EdTech Israel brings together Israeli tech startups and companies for a two-day event. 

Many more excellent tech conferences put up a couple of videos, but don’t create their own channels. Many others don’t (but should) upload any content from their events. (We’re looking at you ICELW). 

+2 votes

Landing a lucrative role in any company is never a cakewalk. The professional world is constantly changing and the traditional education system has failed to equip us with the required skills to excel in today’s dynamic world of work.

The lifespan of skills acquired is getting shorter, and the demand for people with newer and advanced skills is increasing with each passing day. In such a scenario, up-skilling seems to be the only way forward.

There is a burgeoning need for newer skills and learning any of them could help one get that cherished promotion at work!

Why do we need up-skilling?

It won’t be an exaggeration to say that India has no dearth of talented people. However, talented people, with some right attitude and the passion to work hard can learn new skills that would help them rise up faster at their workplace.

In the year 2019, there would be 2.5 lakh IT jobs created for freshers in India. 

Jobs for Data Scientists, Machine Learning Professionals, Cyber Security, Augmented Reality would see an upsurge in demand, over and above the specialist jobs in Marketing, Growth Hacking and Mobile Application developers.

All these sectors are constantly evolving and up-skilling facilitates a cycle of high productivity, increased employment opportunities, income growth and development.

 

Upskill to future-proof your career

The right upgrading of skills goes a long way in improving one’s productivity and overall performance.

 

7 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT WHY UPSKILLING WILL BE SO IMPORTANT IN 2019:

1. Reportedly, 68% of employees prefer to learn at work and because up-skilling is a way to keep one abreast of industry trends and requirement. 

2. Executives prefer employees who avoid redundancy and promote opportunities to enable their employees to learn more.

3. The crème de la crème of all skill up courses in the year 2018 were Finance/Bitcoin/Blockchain, Writing, Digital Marketing, Project Management and Google Analytics. They are offered by e-learning websites like Coursera, Career Anna, Hubspot and Udemy. 

4. Online programmes on Marketing, Entrepreneurship and Public Speaking are always in vogue and the trend will continue in the year 2019.

5. Other courses to reign in the year 2019 would be based on hard skills which companies look for the most – SEO/SEM Marketing, Network and Information Security, Perl/Python/Ruby and Business Intelligence. 

6. According to a Forbes report, 58 million new jobs would be created in Artificial Intelligence by the year 2022. Thus, pursuing this stream would be a very good idea.

7. As per an India Today report, 50,000 jobs are lying vacant in the field of Data Science and Machine Learning with more and more companies trying to tap these new technologies. Professionals would benefit much from opting for a career in such an on-demand stream.

 

Not restricted to technical and functional training

Upskilling need not be strictly technical and functional. Familiarization with the new technological trends in the contemporary digital age helps in aiming for higher opportunities, but soft skills such as communication, leadership, collaboration, and time management are equally important.

As per a LinkedIn report, executives and people managers feel that leadership and communication are the two most important soft skills that employees need to acquire.

 

Online skill up courses can enhance the development of employees

Learning can be a tedious process is a continuous requirement. However, the problem of learning has been solved to a large extent with the proliferation of online tools, which are both convenient and flexible.

We, at Career Anna, want to create better professionals for the industries by bringing quality education beyond the classroom.

Our skill up courses have helped over 9,000 professionals across the country get placed in top companies like Cognizant, Accenture, Dell, Samsung, Infosys, Wipro, Tech Mahindra, TCS, and HCL across high growth technology roles, amongst many other Consulting and Product Companies.

Around 69% of the employees who took our skill up courses either got promoted at work or found better paying job opportunities.

Companies want people who can portray initiative, commitment, and the desire to move ahead. Taking up skill up courses to either enhance your skills or learn new ones will make managers and executives value you.

+1 vote

Augmented data analysis, blended digital tools and connected networks will reign among technology innovations in the coming year, according to IT analyst group Gartner’s top 10 tech trends of 2019

“The top ten digital technology trends are all about building the intelligent digital mesh,” says David W. Cearley, distinguished vice president and analyst for Gartner. “It’s the convergence of all of this and using it to support a continuous innovation process.”

School districts have already seen some of these tools enter the educational space, with innovations such as AI-enabled teaching assistant programs and advanced data collection and analysis to improve student assessments.

As K–12 schools continue their E-rate processes for 2019, districts should be considering what tools are worth investing in to provide their students with the best outcomes in the coming year. 

Artificial Intelligence Will Augment Data-Driven Initiatives

Analysts expect machine learning to play an important role in 2019, offering support for tasks that may require more time, energy and training than teachers and administrators have at their disposal.

  • Autonomous Machines: Gartner predicts AI-enabled machines will be more common in 2019 as the technology advances and becomes commercially available. While autonomous school buses may be far down the road, companies like RobotLAB are already designing interactive learning experiences that incorporate autonomous machines to teach programming.
  • Augmented Analytics: Teachers rely on data analysis to improve their relationship with students, especially as personalized learning programs become more widely adopted. Data collection and analysis has to lead to innovations in student assessment design, helping educators pinpoint where students are struggling and adjusting coursework to supplement those areas. Augmented analytics will help take some of the burdens off teachers who may not be trained in data analytics by using AI to take the brunt of the work instead.

New Tools Blend the Digital and Physical Worlds

Digital transformation in schools is already happening at a rapid rate, and there seems to be no sign of slowing down. Analysts predict the line between the real and digital worlds will continue to blur as current technologies advance and new tools are developed.

  • Digital Twins: This concept is not new. Members of the online community maintain multiple versions of themselves through social media sites, online profiles and other means. Systems such as power plants have digital copies, mirroring the real thing, to monitor daily functions. This technology could be used in conjunction with tools like digital backpacks — longitudinal, interoperable student records — to analyze how individual students learn and to create more effective personalized learning curricula.
  • Empowered Edge: Edge computing takes information processing and brings it closer to the source by using edge devices instead of sending information directly to and from a centralized cloud. The next iteration, empowered edge, will use AI to diversify the kinds of devices able to act as edge endpoints, such as displays or smartphones. This could prove crucial for K–12 schools that require more computing power as they integrate new tools like augmented and virtual reality headsets or connected classroom devices.
  • Immersive Technologies: Speaking of AR and VR, the use of immersive technology is expected to rise as hardware and software continue to improve. According to Gartner, by 2022, 70 percent of organizations will experiment with immersive technology. With 5G on the horizon promising lower latency and more robust connectivity, the quality of these tools will continue to grow, expanding their potential to supplement K–12 education.

Improvements in Mesh Mean a Focus on How Users Engage with Tech

Schools are swiftly replacing older equipment with their next-generation versions. Previously, chalkboards were a natural part of most classrooms; today, interactive whiteboards reign. As this transition continues, K–12 schools will need to be mindful of how they design their learning environments.

  • Smart Spaces: Educators are investigating connected classrooms and modern learning environments as the latest innovation in teaching, and Gartner analysts agree that smart spaces will be a major focus for 2019. Combined with other emerging techs such as AI and the empowered edge, the future of the connected classroom is guaranteed.
  • Digital Ethics and Privacy: The technology on Gartner’s list has the potential broaden how we incorporate technology into our lives, which means proper digital citizenship will be essential. For example, digital twins have great potential for improving learning, but such tools also require giving up valuable data and privacy to the digital universe. This means schools will need to improve curricula addressing responsible technology use and online presence. 

While educators have to wait to see what’s in store for 2019, the technology on Gartner’s list has obvious potential to change the way K–12 schools approach education.

GARTNER’S LIST OF TOP TECH TRENDS FOR 2019:

1. Autonomous Things
2. Augmented Analytics
3. AI-Driven Development
4. Digital Twins
5. Empowered Edge
6. Immersive Technologies
7. Blockchain
8. Smart Spaces
9. Digital Ethics and Privacy
10. Quantum Computing

in K12
+1 vote

In the present scenario, we are witnessing industries undergoing a disruption with a rapid convergence of technologies; which is faster than ever before! These constant changes are making competencies in workforce go obsolete leaving Lifelong Learning as the only feasible option. On the other side, Gen Z has a set of unique behavioural attributes which are shaping the needs of the education industry and pushing them to develop ways to deal with them.

Here are some of the industry trends of delivering learning by Venguswamy Ramaswamy, Global Head of TCS iON, a Tata Consultancy Services unit focused on education, assessment boards and SMBs:

1. Nano-learning

The attention span of learners is persistently shrinking. With the existence of lengthy, text-intensive, un-interactive learning content, students are unwilling to sit in sessions spread over hours. To address this, nano-learning or bite-sized learning is fast becoming a significant trend to support the learner behaviour and ensure attention.

 

2. Lifelong Learning

As per a report, by 2022, 9 per cent of India's workforce is expected to be employed in job roles that don't exist today while 37 per cent is believed to be in new job roles. In order to prepare for this change, it is important to know that learning is not discreet, rather a continuous and connected process in which the needs of the learners vary with time and the stage of their life. Every moment provides a learning opportunity.

Hence, it is necessary to keep a track of the learning culture of an individual across different stages and not just specific learning in a particular stage. This will help understand the capabilities of a learner in its true sense.

 

3. Mass personalization

The pattern of customer-based personalization is gradually progressing wherein adaptive means of learning is taking over the concept of 'one-size fits all'. Being an effective mode of learning, this approach takes into consideration the individual learner abilities, and the appropriate time to consume content, thereby enhancing the quality of learning and the overall experience of learners.

 

4. Data-driven learning

Every individual leaves a large footprint of his/her learning behaviour while learning. Today, such interactions (learning better with video, preferring game format, etc.) are acting as data sources for understanding the learner's patterns and trends, and for devising strategies to make learning more effective than before.

 

5. Self-paced learning

Learners have some nuances, which are unique to them where some students slow in a certain subject but might have the ability to grasp other subjects better. Taking this into consideration, the pace of the content is now being adjusted according to the strengths and weaknesses of the individual student in specific subjects.

 

6. Addictive mechanisms in learning

There are specific constructs either in the content or in the learning platform that attract a learner's attention. These include 'like' or 'comment' buttons, challenges, the capability to score and compete, win badges and points, and so on. The focus of learning is slowly transforming to include these constructs in the content to make learning more addictive.

 

7. Engaged or Immersive Learning

The learner today desires a learning experience with engaging, interactive content that includes games, puzzles, and surprises embedded within. Hence, there is a growing trend of designing content using technologies like augmented reality and virtual reality to create immersive and engaging experiences.

 

8. Collaborative learning

Learning is no longer a one-to-one interaction between the content and the learner. Instead, it is transforming to be an interaction between a group of people in a community construct where students can learn by debating and deliberating on a common platform.

This concept moves beyond the traditional custom of a student and a teacher. A teacher's role is to facilitate learning for learners together learn from each other.

 

9. Twenty-first-century skills

According to a survey, India is expected to form 25 per cent of the world's workforce by 2025. This creates the urgency to equip the country's youth with 21-century skills which have a much higher preference over specific domain skills.

Today, learners are assessed on their ability to work in teams, be ethical in given scenarios, and to be creative and assertive. As a result, the focus has shifted towards developing these capabilities to help learners have a greater advantage in the job space. It is not just academics; it extends beyond to social skills.

 

10. Learning experience platform

Today, rendering mere content is not enough; instead one needs to render experiences to make learning enjoyable. The emphasis rests on enhancing the learner experience management system which uses engaging game cartridges to modulate experiences while delivering content.

As we progress in 2019, we have our energies focused on these evolving trends which are about to dominate the next set of years and we are in the forefront of driving these trends in the market itself.

in EdTech
+1 vote

 

You may have missed it during the summer heatwave, but a very English education technology revolution was announced in the Daily TelegraphIt was the conclusion of intense months of work. There had been a fair amount of Post-it notes, flip charts and workshops involving educators, stakeholders, policymakers and businesses. There was positive support from a small team of Department for Education civil servants, all with a keen interest in education technology. 

Education secretary Damian Hinds demonstrated that he had “got” education technology by recognising that: “There is clear, untapped potential for schools, colleges and universities to benefit even further from the power of technology to support students to learn, reduce teachers’ workload and save money.”

'Are we finally seeing an Edtech revolution?'

Why did that take so long?

In 2010, the incoming the coalition government got started on major education reform with a “bonfire of the quangos”. In some ways good, it also led to the demise of Becta (originally the British Educational Communications and Technology Agency), the organisation tasked with supporting schools to use education technology, and meant we lost an important national conversation about education technology.

Despite the computing curriculum and a big dose of “robot fever”, there had been no real long-standing leadership for education technology in the DfE for years. Various task forces had seemed to suggest a start, stop mentality from government. In that time, England has fallen behind Wales and Scotland, which have, for example, created and developed national platforms – Hwb and GLOW respectively – to share and explore the impact of edtech on teaching and learning.

Systemic change is hard and it’s not that these nations have all the answers, but in England we desperately need to restart the discussion at a national level to find out properly how education technology can make a meaningful contribution. What’s also striking is that since 2010 there has been growing recognition, from other parts of Whitehall, that edtech is also important for the UK’s economy, for jobs and exports. Most recently, in 2017 the Digital Strategy, honed by Matt Hancock, MP, stated: “Education technology is one of the fastest growing sectors in the UK, accounting for 4 per cent of digital companies, and UK businesses have become world leaders in developing innovative new technologies for schools.”

A national strategy for edtech

This is welcome but it urgently needs to become part of a wider strategy for edtech so that there is a coherent approach across government. It is energetic minister Sam Gyimah who is charged with taking this forward.

Despite the wilderness years, progress has been made in the use of edtech by schools. It should no longer surprise that there are real areas of promise across maths with Sumdog, Hegarty Maths, Times Tables Rockstars and Doodle Maths. In reading, the support from ReadingWise and Pobble is impressive and the creative inspiration offered by Night Zookeeper or the immersive Now>Press>Play delights learners.

Scotland’s SpyQuest and Brighton’s Curiscope use the latest augmented and virtual reality for good. Esri UK leads the way in free geography mapping for schools and Crick Software pioneers inclusive edtech. UK organisations FutureLearn, Micro:bit and Raspberry Pi open up learning in new ways to millions of people across the globe.

There are also networks to support the adoption and understanding of edtech by schools and colleges. In further education, the Blended Learning Consortium is a positive example and came out of the good work by FELTAG (the Further Education Learning Technology Action Group).  And market-leading Apple, Google and Microsoft products invest in growing networks of trained, certified, educator ambassadors. But surely these corporate networks can work more effectively together to support adoption and understanding of edtech across schools, colleges and universities? Can we, for instance, create meaningful regional hubs of expertise across the country?

It is against this backdrop, that Edtech50 Schools, supported by Intel, is launching its hunt to find schools that demonstrate excellent digital leadership and practice. It’s needed because the education minister’s summer announcement is a start rather than an endpoint.

Our vision for Edtech 50 schools is that it will help to create a national, school-led network, and one that has the expertise to be heeded by the DfE. It needs to embrace a broad vision and be alive to the possibilities that technology can bring to every aspect of school life – for too long we have ignored the fact that educational technology can rationalise the back office as much as enliven and focus learning and properly support the teacher.

The positive work of groups of committed individuals, the Independent Schools Council Digital Strategy Group, the London Grid for Learning, schools and some multi-academy trusts suggest real opportunity and potential in strengthening the grassroots but with a national focus. Investing in innovation and educators to guide their peers reaps dividends.

Let’s hope this is more than just a short-lived, summer holiday edtech romance.

As we continue with another round of positive consultations on this education technology revolution; it’s good to know it’s already started around the country and beyond.

Now it needs focus, investment and leadership. And ambition.

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