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How Technology Improved The Scope of Education?

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Some notable improvement areas as a result of technology

Learning and technology have taken a new dimension due to major technology impacts in educational institutions. Now a medium is available for teachers to communicative effectively and shares ideas for making the teaching talents better. Teachers also have a pool of endless resources now which can be utilized for offering students the required assistance to boost their advance and ability. In several ways, the computer has improved education. Positive support from the teachers tries to instil their pupils.

Scope of education technology

Other improvement notable areas due to latest technology results

  • Information accessible readily on various subjects – It’s beneficial not only for teachers but also for the students too. Unlimited knowledge can be attained from the internet and more diverse materials will be available since it been presented by the people from various parts of the world. This could open up viewpoints of student’s and then allows to arise new and fresh ideas.
  • Availability of software tools- Many tools available can be used by students for creating far interesting more programs and presentations. Students can make use of the software on projects in which they have to express all their tasks very effectively in details.
  • Helping of the technology for doing away with time restrictions and the distance- Education online has now opened with many possibilities for teacher and students alike. Through the advance educational technology resources, we can now teach or school from anyplace around the world. Several schools are registered and accredited online with essential bodies of government. This actually means that most of the individual is interested to acquire higher educations and have the opportunities for doing so. Lots of people who are having jobs also have chances of pursuing their studies further without giving up their career. 

Technology to improve the scope of education

Online school introduction has made the education more achievable and enjoyable because this allows audio and the visual communicating mode in which everyone shares knowledge, ideas and also information to make others better. Through technology, a transformation has occurred in education so teaching and learning now have become very much interactive. It also has done the way with barriers as the knowledge could be shared now across the borders. Now various cultures can appreciate openly to one another as they could learn various methods of life. Education and technology are correlated and works together for developing each other. Undoubtedly technology can make a change in the scope of education.

posted Mar 12 in General by Darareaksmey

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The world is changing, and education must change with it. Many schools are aware of this fact and are trying to rebuild their activities in accordance with the opportunities offered by new technologies. Some universities borrow ideas from the business world, referring to the experience of successful start-ups in order to launch some new processes for themselves. Gradually, a paper routine leaves the schools, giving way to electronic means of working with data.

1. School as a Service

School as a service begins with the commitment of the state to each student as a digital student. When states reduce historical barriers, the transition to personal digital learning will mean a school service: access to quality courses and teachers from several providers.

Education SaaS changes the basic assumptions – it does not need to associate time and place. This does not mean that everything will become virtual – in the foreseeable future, at least 90 percent of families will benefit from local schools, but this requires new thinking, new staffing models, new budgeting strategies and new ways of communicating with students and families.

2. Mobile Learning

Mobile learning, also known as m-learning, is an educational system. Using portable computing devices (such as iPads, laptops, tablets, PDAs, and smartphones), wireless networks provide mobility and mobile training, which allows to teach and learn to expand beyond the traditional audience. Within the class, mobile training provides instructors and students with increased flexibility and new possibilities for interaction.

3. Gamification in Education

Gamification in education is sometimes described using other terms: game thinking, the principles of the game for learning, the design of motivation, the design of interaction, etc. This differs from game-based learning in that it doesn`t imply that students themselves play commercial video games. It works on the assumption that the kind of interaction that players encounter with games can be transformed into an educational context in order to facilitate learning and influence on students’ behaviour. Because gamers voluntarily spend a lot of time for gaming, researchers and teachers are exploring ways to use the power of video games to motivate and apply it in the classroom.

4. Big Data

“Big Data” is a term that we are used to hearing in business, but it is also an important tool for education. Learning World explores this technological fashion word and talks with an expert on this topic: Kenneth Cuciere, co-author of “Learning with Big Data.”

Cukier sees “Big Data” as an opportunity to adapt learning to the individual needs of students and the learning process. Instead of avoiding this, teachers must accept changes that bring in large data, and use them to their advantage.

One example of the large data that occurs in education is the “Course Signals”, which allow professors to give feedback if there are early signs that students do not exercise or do not use class time.

5. Blended and Flipped Learning

Blended learning is a pedagogical method in which the learner learns, at least in part, by providing content and training through digital and online media using the student controls in time or place. This allows the student to create an individual and integrated approach to learning. Blended training is combined with a flipped class approach to learning.

The Flipped class is a pedagogical model in which the typical elements of the lecture and the homework of the course change to the opposite. Students watch short video lectures or other multimedia materials asynchronously before a class session. Then, class time is devoted to active learning, such as discussions, design or problem assignments, or laboratory exercises. This learning model allows teachers to guide the teaching of students by answering students’ questions and helping them apply the concepts of the course during classes.

6. Massive Online Open Courses

Nowadays MOOCs may not be so widespread as when they first attracted attention, and people no longer think that this is the answer to the problems of educational inequality. Nevertheless, MOOCs still deserve close attention, as it develops as an important part of education, and it offers its students many advantages if used well. Moreover, The New York Times called 2013 the “Year of the MOOC” because it attracted a lot of attention and money.

7. Personalized Learning

Personalized learning is a sort of adaptive learning that considers working with computers to make decisions, based on previous levels of learner understanding when interacting with a computer program. Learning analytics and artificial intelligence are the essences of individual learning because without them it would be impossible to easily adapt the instruction on the basis of immediate answers.

Personalized learning can seem like a dream in many schools, but it’s already happening more than we can imagine – and often behind the back of the teacher.

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At kicoshep school in Kibera, a vast Nairobi slum, Grade 3 is learning English. The teacher, Jacinter Atieno, asks questions about a story on the exploitation of children as domestic servants. At the back of the class, a coach logs information about Mrs Atieno’s performance into a tablet. Halfway through the class, the coach summons three children and tests their reading. The scores go into the tablet, which then makes suggestions—that, say, Mrs Atieno might watch one of its instructional videos, or improve her English pronunciation with its letter-sound tool. The information is uploaded to the county office that runs the local schools and can be reviewed by the teachers’ bosses there.


This is Tusome—“let’s read”, in Kiswahili—in action. A huge programme, funded by USAID to the tune of $74m over five years, it has been adopted by the Kenyan government and is used by 3.4m children in 23,000 government primary schools and 1,500 private schools. The coach-and-tablet element is just one part. A curriculum based on synthetic phonics (widely used in developed-country schools) has been designed and 23m books distributed, along with detailed lesson plans to make life easier for teachers. But technology is crucial to supporting them and providing their bosses with data about their performance. Mrs Atieno is surprisingly enthusiastic: “I love the coach. When I have a problem I can tell her and she comes to help me.”

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