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How Can Institutions Prepare Students to Become Global Citizens?

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Global Citizenship is described as the rights and responsibilities which come with being a member of a global community and whose actions support the community’s purpose and values.

These rights, responsibilities and values are consistent with the concept of humanity.

In this area, it is vital for the institutions to understand why teaching global citizenship in the classroom is a critical component of 21st Century education. The TEDx Talk mentioned below highlights such in great detail.

First Thing FirstPreparing Teachers for Global Citizenship Education

We all know the power of education has no boundary. Through education, one gains knowledge and skills to enhance our lives and environment. Education has the power to mould an individual’s thinking process and assist them to act towards building a more just, peaceful, tolerant and inclusive society.

Going by what, the Incheon Declaration on Education 2030 lay upon, institutions are responsible to not only provide foundational literacy, numeracy and technological skills to students but develop the skills, values and attitudes which enable citizens to lead healthy and fulfilled lives. Education should not be reduced to the production of skilled workers. It must empower students to make informed decisions and respond to local as well global challenges through meaningful education.

Thus, it clearly explains why we say, the first thing institutions need to do is prepare teachers for global citizenship education. The United Nations had launched the Global Education First Initiative in 2012. Research studies under this program identified the lack of teacher’s capacity as a major barrier to Global Citizenship Education. Thus, the global organization is working towards empowering the teachers with knowledge on this subject. This will lead educators nurture the same skills and relevant knowledge about global citizenship to their students.

3 Action Steps for Educators to Teach Global Citizenship

There is no prescribed way to help the students achieve global citizenship. However, what educators can do in this case is plan discussion sessions and activities which help students acquire knowledge and think upon the global issues with greater insight.

1. Leveraging Technology to Connect Students with the Rest of the World

Due to technology advancement, teachers have good number of options to use digital tools and projects that can connect students to the world in ways that promote a mind-set of taking action and applied learning. Many of these can even be learned together with students. Through technology, students can even understand what’s going on in the world as well as collaborate with other students and organizations abroad to become digitally connected.

Some of the schools and projects that aim at offering students with global exposure are- Adobe Youth VoicesGlobal Nomads GroupGlobalSchoolNet.orgReach the World, Skype in the Classroom and others. Schools may connect with these schools and projects to connect the class.

Further there are platforms such like Creatubbles which help students upload as well as share projects, invite others to join in and connect with collaborators from all around the world. This platform gives students the option to discover and be inspired by activities and creations which students abroad are sharing.

2. Using Human Rights Issues as a Platform for Discussion

One of the core tenets of global citizenship education is to encourage and help students make professional commitments to human rights literacy (knowledge), empathy (concern) and responsibility (action).

Students of all ages, socio-economic backgrounds or geographical locations can find human rights relatable on some scale. It is a great starting point to spark discussion and awareness. Educator and UNESCO Delegate for Education, Mareike Hachemer is on a mission to connect education and the global goals. One of the core principles which she enthusiastically backs is education that fosters intercultural competencies and active citizenship.

With discussion as a means, students’ curiosity towards social developmental issues can be ignited. Eventually, teachers can also start working upon utilizing the global goals as a basis for students to start becoming global citizens and also involve them into working upon projects which relate to human rights topics.

3. Making Use of Learn-Think-Act Process to Encourage Global Citizenship

The maxim of Oxfam’s learn-think-act works great for the teachers to introduce global citizenship to their students:

By ‘Learn’ pathway, students will be able to explore the issue, process information and consider it from various perspectives. While exploring, they will also try to understand the underlying causes and consequences of the issue.

Adopting the ‘Think’ pathway, students will exercise their critical thinking ability to bring forth ideas through which the issue can be resolved, relate such to values, think it from global perspective and figure out the nature of power and action.

The ‘Act’ pathway is most crucial component. It allows students to make use of their productive thinking to resolve issues of global concern. Further, through act pathway, students learn to take ownership of their steps and simultaneously also get an opportunity to work on the collective footsteps of the team to resolve any issue.

If this exercise of Learn-Think-Act is routinely practiced, it will soon become a second nature of students- finally resulting to a class of amazing, young global citizens.

Summation

Thus, institutions have to understand that the initial motivation concerning global citizenship has to come from internal commitment and not from external pressure. As responsible professionals and well-wishers of the society, educators indeed have a significant responsibility to make students understand the complexity and the interrelated place in the world to help them become global citizens. These citizens are going to be the change makers of the society so building their skill sets in that direction is not only necessary but a mandatory aspect of meaningful education.

posted May 2 by Jorani

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In November 2018, Michael R. Bloomberg announced a donation of $1.8 billion to Johns Hopkins University to create a fund that would help low and moderate-income group students complete their college degrees. Without a doubt, this is an incredibly meaningful initiative. However, it led me to start wondering if monetary support alone is enough for students with special accessibility needs or students who come from a variety of marginalized backgrounds.

When we think of college, the first question that often comes to mind is affordability. But affordability is not the only factor. Most educational institutions provide financial support to a few selected students in the form of scholarships and loans. However, students require much more than just financial support to survive four years of college and develop the skills and confidence they need to begin successful careers.

How Edtech Entrepreneurs Can Make College More Accessible To All Students

Most colleges fall short here. There are far more inequalities and biases embedded in the fibers of our society than what financial aid for tuition can bridge. I believe that real college access should open doors for students irrespective of race, gender, immigrant status, family income or physical mobility. A recent study revealed that at some of the best colleges across the United States, more students were from the top 1% than from the bottom 60% of income groups. 

Entrepreneurs building companies of the future should be concerned. The workforce, comprising of millennials driven by intellectual curiosity, moral obligation and exposure to humanitarian causes, is inquisitive about freedom, equality and inclusivity. An employer is judged by its commitment to society and causes. Especially in tech startups, graduating students have begun to consider the brand image of a future employer before saying yes to an offer. Therefore, it will be increasingly beneficial for entrepreneurs if they build brands that nurture an ecosystem where students are provided opportunities based on their merit and not simply their elite pedigree.

As part of their measures to diversify their student bodies, colleges often claim to support students by providing them with tuition fee waivers. But free tuition is helpful only when one is able to get an offer of admission. Moreover, there are indirect costs beyond tuition fee that financial aid doesn’t cover, such as food, housing, and supplementary course material. This forces many students to earn money during the time that they should be studying. Some incur large personal debt, others skip classes to work odd jobs, while a few succumb to financial stress and drop out.

The problem becomes even more complex when dealing with learners from diverse backgrounds who have special needs such as students who require accessibility considerations and students with learning disabilities.

 

Having worked closely with various state public schools with students from mid- to low-income families as well as accessibility services at various colleges, I’ve observed that students require a lot of support beyond classroom lectures. Unlike students from affluent families who get mentoring and support right from the start, less privileged students struggle to balance classes with part-time jobs. That’s where edtech entrepreneurs such as myself come in, by building systems that enable students to have access to higher education and study materials. Here’s how we can provide support beyond financial aid.

1. Increased Accessibility To Higher Education Even Before College

Tech entrepreneurs are in a position to influence change at the grassroots level. The pyramid leading to success in college is built on the cornerstone of early education in high school. Edtech entrepreneurs can help in two ways:

• Provide technology training for teachers in low-income neighborhoods. According to the Education Week Research Center, teachers in under-funded schools are less likely to receive technological training for teaching when compared to their counterparts in wealthier schools. Edtech companies can provide skills training for teachers on their platforms.

• Provide high school students with summer jobs/internships that give them access to an environment with technology and give them an opportunity to work in the tech-startup landscape once they graduate.

2. Corporate Network Support Circles

College is where the blueprint of the business world is laid down, and it’s important to inculcate diversity at this grassroots level. Change doesn’t start from top-down leadership; it happens from the bottom up. Currently, about 72% of CEO’s in top Fortune 500 companies are white males, and less than 1% are African-American females.

One of the key hindrances in diversity at the top level is that people tend to hire or favor candidates similar to themselves -- usually from the same schools. Students with special learning needs bear the brunt of this even more. Even if they manage to steer through their financial constraints, it is incredibly difficult to break through the glass ceiling without a supporting network.

Colleges should aid in creating corporate networks where diverse groups of students can get the right introductions. Tech entrepreneurs can help further by promoting diversity initiatives in their organizations that call for meritorious students from lower socioeconomic standing. Such initiatives should begin at the high-school level. Entrepreneurs can also support non-Ivey, state schools and community colleges that hold job fairs and employment drives.

3. Subsidized, Affordable Textbooks And Study Materials

The rising costs of textbooks add a significant burden on students who struggle to make ends meet on their limited financial aid. Even though there are a lot of services that provide secondhand books or online books, a college student still ends up spending over $1,200 on average, according to the College Board. Edtech entrepreneurs and colleges should join forces to provide subsidized books and online notes for a nominal fee. 

It’s easy to get access to reading lists of various subjects and provide materials to students accordingly in the form of study guides, notes, homework help, etc. In fact, many startups, including my own, are already doing that.

Edtech companies currently exist in their bubbles -- creating products that are redefining education. However, it is becoming increasingly important that policymakers and entrepreneurs work together to steer the discourse of higher education. It surely will be a long journey to effect change, but it will be worth starting today. 

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As educators, we constantly strive to prepare our students for the ‘real world’ that exists around them. We teach them how to read, write, and calculate. Then, of course, there are the less tangible skills we teach; such as how to work in a team, think critically, and be curious about the things they encounter each day.

We want to prepare them to lead productive and successful lives once they leave us and enter into the realm of adulthood. But what lies ahead for our students in the future? Did educators of twenty years ago know that so much of our world would be based on computers and technology now? Could they have known what skills would be needed in the job market today? Unlikely, but yet they had to do their best to prepare their students for this world anyhow. Nowadays, educators are still charged with the same complicated task – preparing students for the unknown.

Tony Wagner of Harvard University worked to uncover the 7 survival skills required for the 21st century. To accomplish this, hundreds of CEOs in business, non-profits and educational institutions were interviewed. A list of seven skills that people will need to survive and thrive in the 21st century was compiled from their answers.

We may not know exactly what lies ahead for our students in the future, but we have the advantage of knowing what skills they will need once they get there. Here are the 7 survival skills of the 21st century, along with how they may look being purposefully applied in a classroom.

Skills #1: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

Preparation: Students will need to develop their skills at seeing problems from different angles and formulating their own solutions. Regardless of the field they choose to enter for their careers, the ability to think and act quickly is an indispensable tool for the future. To practice this, teachers should present students with situations in which they need to figure things out for themselves – where skills that they have already developed can be drawn upon and applied to help them figure out a problem.

The problem should ideally lend itself to multiple solutions, as we do not want to teach students that there is only one answer available, but instead that problem-solving can be a creative and personal experience. Situational problems in mathematics provide a good example of these skills at work.

Skill #2: Collaboration Across Networks and Leading by Influence

Preparation: Understanding that not every person is born a natural leader.

However, the ability to lead others can definitely help a person to advance and become successful in their chosen career. Also, finding a job where you don’t need to be able to work closely and harmoniously with others can be quite a difficult task. To best prepare students in this area, more than just the typical teamwork is required. Instead of simply getting into a group and splitting the tasks with each other, students should instead be encouraged to take on different roles within their group for each task within the project.

Sometimes they can be the ‘manager’ and at other times they can be an ‘organizer’ or a ‘graphic designer’. There are many different roles that students can fill during a project with their peers that allows them to work with others in a more collaborative way than just breaking apart a project and then putting it back together in the end.

Skill #3: Agility and Adaptability

Preparation: If we look back at the last twenty years we can see how much has changed in the workplace and the world

Our students need to be comfortable with the idea of change and be willing to adapt to the changes around them. Teachers can create a very dynamic environment within the classroom that can help to prepare students for the future. Varying the teaching strategies we use, the setup of the classroom, the ways that learning is demonstrated by students, and even the guidelines for group work or homework can help students learn to adapt.

Have students create a storyline, for example, then surprise them with a mandatory element to incorporate, or even have them switch work and complete a task based on the preparations of another. They might grumble at first, but the skills will serve them well!

Skill #4: Initiative and Entrepreneurship

Preparation: Students need to be able to take initiative and contribute to the world. We should encourage these skills within our classrooms and our communities. Our students can be incredibly creative and interested in shaping their experience in the classroom, so we can ask them for much more than a list of classroom rules and consequences.

Let them know that you are available and willing to listen to any of their ideas about improving the classroom or school. Help them organize their ideas and put them into practice – even if an idea may fail. It can be a valuable lesson about how to analyze what went wrong and consider how to improve the idea. Students should never be afraid of trying because they are afraid of failure.

Skill #5: Effective Oral and Written Communication

Preparation: Despite advances in technology, these skills never diminish in importance. Think of a boss or manager sending you an email full of grammatical errors or presenting a new business plan while speaking too low and reading the entire presentation off a sheet of paper. What would you honestly think? Consider some of the best communicators you have seen – what makes them rise above the rest? We need to teach our students how to speak confidently and clearly.

This doesn’t come naturally, but with practice; enunciation, speed, volume, gestures, and eye-contact can all be taught and learned. The same skills that help in drama can help in oral communication. Take a moment one day to begin teaching a lesson in a very ineffective way and see how long it takes your students to ask what you’re doing… they should be able to tell you exactly what’s ‘wrong’ with your communication skills!

As for written communication, we need to continue to emphasize the rules while also teaching students how to use the technology available to them to help check their writing. The difference between formal and informal writing is quite important for students to learn and start applying.

Skill #6: Accessing and Analyzing Information

Preparation: Students have access to unimaginable amounts of information today. The Internet provides an incredible research tool that can be their best friend or worst enemy. Accessing information is easy, but accessing good information tends to be more complicated. Students need to be taught how to sift through the millions of web pages available on a topic and find what they need (and be able to trust what they find). They need to learn the difference between factual information and factual-sounding opinions.

Many students today will check ‘answer’ websites to gather information, not really thinking about how the information was written by a person who may or may not be correct or truly knowledgeable in a subject area. In the same way, a teacher can ‘think-aloud’ reading strategies, we can think-aloud Internet searching strategies. Project your screen on the board and learn about a topic with your students. Show them how to search, and how to use those ‘answer’ sites without being misled!

Skill #7: Curiosity and Imagination

Preparation: Our students come to us naturally curious about their world and wanting to explore it. Their imaginations are vast and untamed, creating endless amounts of practical and impractical things. Our task as educators has less to do with teaching them how to be curious and imaginative, and more to do with not taking that away from them. We need to continue to encourage them to develop these skills, as well as teach them how to apply them creatively and purposefully. Imagine the little boy who loves soldiers and robots, but dislikes princesses.

How do you react when he shows you his freshly-drawn picture of a soldier using a robot-inspired weapon to destroy a princess? Do you celebrate his creativity in the same way you celebrate the world-saving-robot drawn by the student next to him? Is his picture hung on the wall?

We don’t all like and appreciate the same things, so an educator must be very careful about how they nurture and develop their students’ creativity and imagination. We can teach them which things are appropriate in which situations without making them feel like their ideas are wrong or bad.

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